Follow Robert Facebook
Email Robert Email
Education
Apr 28, 2022

Economics: The Inflation Surge

Sponsored Content provided by Robert Burrus - Dean , Cameron School of Business - UNC-Wilmington

Contributed by Dr. Thomas D. Simpson, Executive in Residence at the UNCW Cameron School of Business. Dr. Simpson joined the Department of Economics & Finance after his retirement from the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System in Washington, DC.

According to public opinion polls, after a forty-year hiatus, inflation has returned as the top concern facing our nation.   The chart below shows the most widely known measure of inflation—the Consumer Price Index (CPI).  The blue line shows headline CPI inflation, and the red line shows headline inflation after removing volatile food and energy prices—so-called core inflation.  Headline inflation rose to 8.5 percent over the twelve months ending in March, the highest in forty years.  Not surprisingly, this increase was paced by energy prices, as you observed from filling up your car.  Even after removing food and energy prices, core prices rose 6.5 percent, also the highest in forty years.  It is noteworthy that forty years ago the country was enduring the worst recession of the postwar period (to that time)—which was the cost that had to be paid to bring inflation under control.
Chart, line chart, histogramDescription automatically generated

The term inflation refers to a sustained increase in the average price of the goods and services that we buy.  There are two primary indexes that measure consumer prices, the CPI (mentioned above) and the Personal Consumption Expenditures (PCE) index.  The PCE index is favored by the Federal Reserve (Fed) and many analysts because it is thought to be a more accurate measure of the change in the cost of living.  The Fed has set a target for the PCE index of 2 percent, and that target has been seriously breached over the past year.
 
Inflation is caused by too much aggregate demand in relation to aggregate supply.  Our current bout of inflation can be traced to the COVID shock in early 2020.  At the onset of the lockdown, both demand and supply plunged, total output collapsed, and many prices fell.  Once conditions began to stabilize, demand snapped back more sharply than supply.  The rebound in demand was aided by a dramatic shift in Fed monetary policy—that took short-term interest rates down to near zero—and that was supplemented by massive purchases of Treasury and other securities, and by an unprecedented surge in federal spending (exceeding $5 trillion) aimed at COVID relief.  With demand outstripping supply, business inventories were drawn down—shelves became bare—and prices began to turn up.  Some of the restraints on supply have come from supply chain disruptions—notably of microchips—and a reluctance of workers to return to the workforce because of the pandemic.  The continued substantial excess of demand over supply has led to faster inflation. 
 
Previous experience has shown that once inflation has persisted this long, it gains a momentum that is hard to break.  Businesses transition from viewing price changes as indicators of movements in relative scarcity to indicators of broader-based inflation, and these businesses change their pricing strategy to raise their prices frequently to protect against anticipated losses of the purchasing power of their dollar receipts.  Similarly, workers seek increases in compensation that cover the loss of purchasing power that they face.  For most workers, their compensation will in time adjust upward to the higher rate of inflation, but those in lower-income brackets typically lag behind.  Similarly, prices of real estate and stocks will rise in line with underlying inflation after a period of adjustment to higher underlying inflation. 
 
The task of bringing inflation under control falls on the Fed as it has in the past.  The Fed will need to raise short-term interest rates a good bit before we see inflation on a distinct downward trajectory.  To some degree, inflation relief will come from an easing of supply-chain disruptions and a return of idled workers to the labor force.  But those factors will not be nearly enough.  Interest rates will need to rise above the underlying rate of inflation to curb demand by enough to stop inflation momentum.  The burden of these rate increases will fall heavily on the housing and other interest-sensitive sectors.  As often in the past, this tightening of monetary policy may well push our economy into recession.  The longer the Fed acts cautiously in limiting necessary increases in interest rates, the greater the odds of a painful recession.  
     
For more on this topic check out: www.thomasdsimpson.com


Robert T. Burrus, Jr., Ph.D., is the dean of the Cameron School of Business at the University of North Carolina Wilmington, named in June 2015. Burrus joined the UNCW faculty in 1998. Prior to his current position, Burrus was interim dean, associate dean of undergraduate studies and the chair of the department of economics and finance. Burrus earned a Ph.D. and a master’s degree in economics from the University of Virginia and a bachelor’s degree in mathematical economics from Wake Forest University. The Cameron School of Business has approximately 90 full-time faculty members and 30 administrative and staff members. The AACSB-accredited business school currently enrolls approximately 2,600 undergraduate students in three degree programs and 750 graduate students in four degree programs. The school also houses the prestigious Cameron Executive Network, a group of more than 200 retired and practicing executives that provide one-on-one mentoring for Cameron students. To learn more about the Cameron School of Business, please visit http://csb.uncw.edu/. Questions and comments can be sent to [email protected].
 

Other Posts from Robert Burrus

Uncwgradprogram 300x250
Ico insights

INSIGHTS

SPONSORS' CONTENT
Untitleddesign2

The Importance of Real Estate Appraisals

Steve Mitchell - Cape Fear REALTORS®
Jordain 422430214

Why Meetings Suck and What to Do About It

Jordan Cain - APPROVE
Tommytaylor ceo unitedway

How Philanthropy Fits Into Your Financial Plan

Tommy Taylor - United Way

Trending News

Haley Promoted To President, CEO Of Wilmington Downtown Inc.

Staff Reports - Jun 18, 2024

Commercial Real Estate Firm Adds Four Partners

Staff Reports - Jun 18, 2024

Women To Watch Awards Finalists Announced

Staff Reports - Jun 18, 2024

Blue Surf Cafe To Celebrate 10th Anniversary, Add Dinner Service

Jessica Maurer - Jun 19, 2024

Proposed Castle Hayne Projects Could Bring Thousands Of Homes, Commercial Space

Emma Dill - Jun 17, 2024

In The Current Issue

Info Junkie: ChyAnn Ketchum

ChyAnn Ketchum, public information officer for the city of Southport, shares her top info and tech picks....


Startups Weigh Local Support

What do Wilmington startup newcomers moving for quality of life and proximity to the beach think of the area through a technological and ent...


Aging In Place

Based on an age-in-place philosophy, CCRCs have existed for more than a century....

Book On Business

The 2024 WilmingtonBiz: Book on Business is an annual publication showcasing the Wilmington region as a center of business.

Order Your Copy Today!


Galleries

Videos

2024 Power Breakfast: The Next Season